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Rotschild

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Songbirds and the Tale of A Chain - Rothschild

Rothschild, one of the best known Herend patterns, takes its name from the fabulously wealthy banking family.

Chinese and Japanese decorators frequently included on their porcelain naturalist painting of birds with bright, exotic plumage birds of paradise, peacocks, grouse, duck, cranes or cockerels.

These became especially popular with Chinese makers in the mid-17th to late-18th centuries.

As soon as the secret of porcelain was discovered in Europe, bird décors arrived as well. Initially, they followed the Far Eastern patterns closely. However, the Chinese and Japanese birds soon gave way to naturalistic portraits of the birds of European meadows and forests.

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The songbirds were usually portrayed in pairs or with their fledglings. Often they would be perched on the bough of a tree or bush.

Like many other motifs, this bird pattern soon spread to almost every European porcelain factory, including the Herend Porcelain Manufactory, where the birds of the nearby Bakony Hills were the inspiration.
The pieces, with a gilded edge, show 12 species of bird with bright plumage, painted with naturalism, perched on a stylized bough of a tree, springing from a little patch of green grass.Caught in the twigs is a delicate, twinkling gold chain. Flying around are little butterflies and insects, painted in pastel shades.The birds appear singly or in pairs, close to or far away from each other, with or without the gold chain.

The pieces, with a gilded edge, show 12 species of bird with bright plumage, painted with naturalism, perched on a stylized bough of a tree, springing from a little patch of green grass.Caught in the twigs is a delicate, twinkling gold chain. Flying around are little butterflies and insects, painted in pastel shades.The birds appear singly or in pairs, close to or far away from each other, with or without the gold chain.
The several branches of the baronial Rothschild family, who gave their name to the pattern, regularly ordered services in the décor from the 1860s onwards.

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